How to make herb-infused honeys

Herb-infused honeys

I love to use my homegrown herbs to make these honeys, but not everyone has a herb garden. Fortunately, fresh herbs are available in any supermarket. The fresher the herb, the more flavor it will impart to the honey. As for the honey itself, I recommend buying a good-quality local honey for the infusions. The flavor is unsurpassed.

The infused honeys are amazingly flavorful, plus they make beautiful holiday gifts… from your kitchen and your heart!


Lavender

Herb-infused honeys

makes one 4 oz (120 ml) bottle
active time: 15 min

For the supplies

  1. 4 oz (120 ml) bottles or jars – washed and thoroughly dried
  2. 1/2 cup (4 oz) (120 ml) good quality orange blossom or clover honey per bottle/jar (for larger bottles/jars, multiply the amount of honey and herbs needed equally)

For a single herb infusion – all measurements are for a 4 oz (120 ml) bottle/jar (choose one herb from list below)

  1. 1 sprig basil (a sprig with small leaves is easier to fit in the bottle/jar)
  2. 1 tablespoon shaved fresh ginger (use a vegetable hand-peeler)
  3. 1 tablespoon dried lavender blossoms
  4. 2 sprigs lemon balm
  5. 1 sprig mint
  6. 1 sprig oregano
  7. 1 sprig rosemary
  8. 2 sprigs summer or winter savory
  9. 1 sprig sweet marjoram
  10. 1 sprig French tarragon
  11. 4 sprigs thyme
  12. 4 sprigs lemon thyme

For a single herb & spice infusion – all measurements are for a 4 oz (120 ml) bottle/jar (choose one herb & spice combo from list below)

  1. 2 teaspoons anise seeds
  2. 1 small sprig basil & 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  3. 1 small sprig basil & 1 teaspoon anise seeds
  4. 2 teaspoons cardamom pods
  5. 1 stick cinnamon & 1 sprig sage
  6. 1 sprig rosemary & 1 strip orange zest (use vegetable hand-peeler)
  7. 4 sprigs fresh thyme & 1 strip lemon zest (use vegetable hand-peeler)

  1. Choose one herb or one herb & spice combination for each bottle/jar. Place herb (and/or spice) in bottle/jar and set aside. Place honey in a saucepan and heat over medium heat until the honey becomes liquidy or until candy thermometer reaches 180ºF (82ºC), making sure the honey doesn’t come to a boil. Using a funnel, pour the hot honey into each bottle/jar, making sure the herbs are submerged. Place honey bottles on a cooling rack and cool to room temperature. Once cooled, close bottle/jar tightly and store in a cool dark place for 1 week before using.
  2. Cook’s note: Store the infused honey in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year.

Thyme

Viviane’s tip
  1. The Container Store is a great source for glass bottles and jars. I also recommend Weck jars which come in a myriad of sizes and shapes.

Herb-infused honeys

condiment, honey, herbs

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